Sunday, October 17, 2021

#4 "Buddy" Myer - Washington Senators


Charles Solomon Myer
Washington Senators
Second Base

Bats:
  Left  Throws:  Right  Height:  5'10"  Weight:  163
Born:  March 16, 1904, Ellisville, MS
Major League Teams:  Washington Senators 1925-1927; Boston Red Sox 1927-1928; Washington Senators 1929-1941
World Series Appearances:  Washington Senators 1925, 1933
Died:  October 31, 1974, Baton Rouge, LA (70)

With the exception of a two-year detour to Boston, Buddy Myer played the bulk of his 17-year big league career with the Senators.  He served during different points of his career as the regular third baseman, shortstop and ultimately second baseman for the Senators and reached the World Series twice with the team, in 1925 and 1933.  Known for his speed early in his career, Myer led the league with 28 stolen bases in 1928.  Myer was a two-time All-Star in 1935 and 1937, and he enjoyed a career year in 1935 when he won the league's batting title with a .349 average.  He finished fourth in that year's MVP voting, behind winner Hank Greenberg (#54), Wes Ferrell (#94) and Joe Vosmik (#8).  Myer led all American League second baseman in fielding percentage in 1931 and 1938.  He retired following the 1941 season with his career statistics ranking towards the top of many all-time leader lists.  Myer collected 2,131 hits, scored 1,174 runs and batted .303 for his career with a .389 on-base percentage.  He hit 38 career home runs, with 15 of those being inside the park home runs.

September 7, 2021 - First day of school
Myer's SABR biography contains a note from baseball analyst Bill James comparing his lifetime statistics to those of future Hall of Famer and long-time National League second baseman Billy Herman (#136).  While Herman benefitted from being the best at his position in his league, Myer was perhaps unfairly overlooked as he was arguably the third best second baseman in the American League during his era, behind Charlie Gehringer (#77) and Tony Lazzeri (#74).  Despite having nearly similar career numbers, Myer received one Hall of Fame vote in 1949 and Herman was elected into the Hall by the Veteran's Committee in 1975.

Building the Set
September 7, 2021 from Sharon, MA - Card #30
The 30th card added to my Diamond Stars set came from eBay seller spicymakicombo, located in Sharon, Massachusetts.  I added this card to my Watch List, intending to save its potential purchase for a rainy day when the seller contacted me with a lower offer for the card.  I made one modest counteroffer, the seller accepted, and the card arrived a few days later, on the first day of school for our kids.

Variations Available
1 - 1934 / green back / 1933 statistics / 1934 copyright
2 - 1935 / green back / 1934 statistics / 1934 copyright
3 - 1936 / blue back / 1935 statistics / 1934 copyright ✅

The Card / Senators Team Set
I added the blue backed version of this card to my set, released in 1936.  Myer is shown having just retired a baserunner, although the pose here would suggest he didn't follow the tip contained on the back of the card.  The tip on the back instructs the infielder to catch the ball thrown by the catcher, and hold the glove in front of the base, allowing the runner to slide right into the glove.  Then again, maybe Myer did follow the tip and he's holding his glove up following the tag to show the umpire he had the ball.

1936 Season
After winning the league's batting title, Myer suffered one of the least productive seasons of his career, as he was limited to only 51 games.  He called it a season and left the Senators in August, apparently dealing with a bad stomach ulcer.  In his absence, Ossie Bluege (#71) saw the majority of playing time at second base for Washington.  Myer batted only .269 in 1936, and he'd return to full health and his All-Star form in 1937.

1933 Goudey #153
1934-36 Batter-Up (R318) #133
1939 Play Ball #100
1940 Play Ball #17
1941 Double Play #73

Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1927 Playing Cards (W560) 6♣
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (0):  N/A
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1992 Conlon Collection TSN #503

49 - Myer non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/15/21.

Sources:

Previous Card:  #3 "Rabbit" Maranville - Boston Braves

Sunday, October 10, 2021

#69 Earl Grace - Pittsburgh Pirates


Robert Earl Grace
Pittsburgh Pirates
Catcher

Bats:  Left  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  175
Born:  February 24, 1907, Barlow, KY
Major League Teams:  Chicago Cubs 1929, 1931; Pittsburgh Pirates 1931-1935; Philadelphia Phillies 1936-1937
Died:  December 22, 1980, Phoenix, AZ (73)

Earl Grace played in parts of eight seasons in the majors, mainly as a back-up catcher.  He appeared in at least 90 games for three seasons in a row with the Pirates between 1932 and 1934, and unsurprisingly those were also his best seasons.  Although he was a career .263 hitter, Grace was known more for his defense and the handling of his pitching staffs, and his .998 fielding percentage led all National League catchers in 1932.  That mark set a record for National League catchers, held until the Giants' Wes Westrum broke the record in 1950 with a .999 fielding percentage.  Grace's last two seasons in the majors were spent with the Phillies, where he split catching duties with player/manager Jimmie Wilson (#22).  He played in parts of three minor league seasons between 1938 and 1940 with the Cardinals, Red Sox and Dodgers organizations before retiring.  In 627 career games, Grace collected 493 hits, including 31 home runs and 251 RBIs.  He occasionally scouted for the Yankees following his playing days.

Building the Set
August 31, 2021 from Niwot, CO - Card #29
To close out the summer, and after adding a trio of cards from Clean Sweep Auctions, I decided to add another trio of cards, this time from eBay seller Vintage Card Company from Niwot, Colorado.  I had a few of these cards on my watch list for a good chunk of the summer and while parsing down that watch list recently I opted for the Buy It Now option in lieu of the Remove from Watch List option.  The former option is always more fun.  The trio of cards arrived the day of my Mom's back surgery so they were a welcome sight in my mailbox after a day of anxiety and waiting.  (She's doing great now, slowly but surely recovering.)

Variations Available
1 - 1935 / green back / 1934 statistics / 1935 copyright

The Card / Pirates Team Set
That apparatus on wheels behind Grace is apparently some kind of screen stationed behind home plate during batting practice.  There's another instance of one of these screens showing up on Ducky Medwick's (#66) card.  Linked here is an entire Twitter thread with a few hobby notables weighing in on the somewhat mysterious screen.  The tip on the back of the card instructs catchers how to properly give signals to their pitchers, being mindful of a runner on second base potentially stealing signs.  As the tip points out, crossed signals could lead to passed balls, "or, worse, a smashed finger."

1935 Season
This was Grace's fifth and final season with the Pirates, and he appeared in only 77 games.  Tom Padden was the club's opening day catcher and he'd start 90 games throughout the season with Grace making 62 starts.  On May 25th, Grace was behind the plate when the Braves' Babe Ruth (#109) went 4 for 4 with three home runs, the last home runs hit by Ruth during his career.

Phillies Career
On November 12, 1935, Grace was traded by the Pirates with pitcher Claude Passeau to the Phillies for catcher Al Todd.  He settled into a platoon with player/manager Wilson, seeing time almost exclusively against right-handed pitchers.  In 1936, Grace started 53 games behind the plate with Wilson starting 54 and Bill Atwood starting the other 47 games.  Grace returned to the Phillies in 1937, his final year in the majors.  Atwood received the majority of starts behind the plate that season, with Grace receiving 55 starts.  In his two seasons in Philadelphia, Grace appeared in 166 games, batting .230 with 10 home runs and 61 RBIs.  On December 8, 1937, he was dealt to the Cardinals for catcher Cap Clark, and Grace would split the 1938 season with the top farm clubs of the Cardinals and Red Sox.

1934 Goudey #58
1934-36 Batter-Up (R318) #69
1936 World Wide Gum #103
1993 Conlon Collection TSN #938

Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1934 Goudey #58 Grace
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (0):  N/A
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1993 Conlon Collection TSN #938

13 - Grace non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/15/21.

Sources:

Next Card: #70 "Hal" Trosky - Cleveland Indians

Sunday, October 3, 2021

#68 "Sam" Leslie - Brooklyn Dodgers


Samuel Andrew Leslie
Brooklyn Dodgers
First Base

Bats:
  Left  Throws:  Left  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  192
Born:  July 26, 1905, Moss Point, MS
Major League Teams:  New York Giants 1929-1933; Brooklyn Dodgers 1933-1935; New York Giants 1936-1938
World Series Appearances:  New York Giants 1936-1937
Died:  January 21, 1979, Pascagoula, MS (73)

Behind future Hall of Famer and first baseman Bill Terry (#14) on the Giants' depth chart, Sam Leslie spent the first four and a half seasons of his big league career seeing limited playing time.  Between 1929 and 1932, he appeared in 133 games for the Giants, with 125 of those appearances coming as a pinch-hitter.  He established a major league single-season record (since broken) of 22 pinch-hits in 1932 which is still the Giants' franchise single-season record.  On June 16, 1933, Leslie finally got his chance at regular playing time when he was dealt to the Dodgers for Watty Clark and Lefty O'Doul.  He enjoyed his finest seasons in Brooklyn, batting .332 with 102 RBIs in 1934 and following that up by batting .308 with 93 RBIs in 1935.  Both RBI totals led the club in those two years but Casey Stengel's (#150) Dodgers club couldn't crack the second division in the league.  

Leslie was sold back to the Giants before the 1936 season, and he'd play three final seasons in mostly a back-up role again, this time to Johnny McCarthy.  Leslie was a key player in the Giants' push to winning the pennant in both 1936 and 1937, unfortunately losing to the Yankees both years in the World Series.  Leslie retired with 749 hits, a .304 batting average, 36 home runs and 389 RBIs.

Building the Set
August 31, 2021 from Niwot, CO - Card #28
To close out the summer, and after adding a trio of cards from Clean Sweep Auctions, I decided to add another trio of cards, this time from eBay seller Vintage Card Company from Niwot, Colorado.  I had a few of these cards on my watch list for a good chunk of the summer and while parsing down that watch list recently I opted for the Buy It Now option in lieu of the Remove from Watch List option.  The former option is always more fun.  The trio of cards arrived the day of my Mom's back surgery so they were a welcome sight in my mailbox after a day of anxiety and waiting.  (She's doing great now, slowly but surely recovering.)

Variations Available
1 - 1935 / green back / 1934 statistics / 1935 copyright

The Card / Dodgers Team Set
There's quite a bit of grime on this card, but I guess that's to be expected from a well-loved, 86-year-old baseball card.  I had to double check the wonderful reference book Baseball Uniforms of the 20th Century by Marc Okkonen to see if the Dodgers ever had their team named spelled out on their jerseys in red.  In 1933, their road uniforms spelled out Dodgers in blue with a red outline.  Beginning in 1934 and through 1936, both their home and away uniforms spelled out Brooklyn in blue with a red outline.  I believe the artist here was taking some liberties as the source photograph most likely has Leslie in a Giants uniform and the artist needed to swap that for a Dodgers uniform.  The tip on the back of the card instructs first basemen how to take a throw at the bag, especially when needing to stretch or when there's danger of collision with the runner.

1935 Season
In his final full season with the Dodgers, Leslie was again their every day first baseman, most regularly sharing the Brooklyn infield with Tony Cuccinello (#55) at second base, Lonny Frey (#117) at shortstop and Joe Stripp (#89) at third base.  Leslie won the team's batting title (.308) and RBI title (93) and his 30 doubles were second on the club behind Frey's 35.  Leslie appeared in 142 games.  It's a shame he didn't get more regular playing time during his career as he truly excelled when given the chance.

1934 Goudey #49
1934-36 Batter-Up (R318) #46
1935 Goudey 4-in-1 (R321)
1936 Goudey Wide Pen Premiums
(R314) #A64

Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1934 Goudey #49
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (0):  N/A
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1992 Conlon Collection TSN #504

24 - Leslie non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/13/21.

Sources:

Previous Card:  #67 Marvin Owen - Detroit Tigers

Sunday, September 26, 2021

#53 Oscar Melillo - St. Louis Browns


Oscar Donald Melillo
St. Louis Browns
Second Base

Bats:
 Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  5'8"  Weight:  150
Born:  August 4, 1899, Chicago, IL
Major League Teams:  St. Louis Browns 1926-1935; Boston Red Sox 1935-1937
As a Manager:  St. Louis Browns 1938
Died:  November 14, 1963, Chicago, IL (64)

Oscar Melillo, better known by his nickname "Ski," was a steady hitting and slick fielding second baseman in the American League for 12 seasons, spending most of his time with the Browns.  In 1926, while suffering from Bright's Disease, his doctor informed him he needed to go on a diet consisting exclusively of spinach if he wanted to stave off a potentially fatal kidney ailment.  Melillo complied and he earned a second nickname, "Spinach," for his troubles.  He was the Browns regular second baseman for seven seasons between 1929 and 1935 before finishing his career with the Red Sox.  Melillo hit a career high .306 in 1931 while driving in 75 runs.  In 1933, he drove in a career high 79 runs.  Melillo was one of the best defensive infielders of his day, leading the league in fielding percentage for all second basemen twice.  His 965 double plays turned at second base currently rank 34th on the all-time list.  Melillo collected 1,316 hits over his big league career, batting .260 with 22 home runs and 547 RBIs.

He spent another 12 seasons as a major league coach with the Browns (1938), Indians (1939-1940, 1942, 1945-1948, 1950), Red Sox (1952-1953) and Athletics (1955-1956).  Melillo served as an interim manager for the Browns at the end of their 1938 season, replacing the departed Gabby Street, and guiding the team to a 2-7-1 record over their final 10 games.  He'd win a World Series ring while with the Indians coaching staff in 1948.

Building the Set
August 31, 2021 from Niwot, CO - Card #27
To close out the summer, and after adding a trio of cards from Clean Sweep Auctions, I decided to add another trio of cards, this time from eBay seller Vintage Card Company from Niwot, Colorado.  I had a few of these cards on my watch list for a good chunk of the summer and while parsing down that watch list recently I opted for the Buy It Now option in lieu of the Remove from Watch List option.  The former option is always more fun.  The trio of cards arrived the day of my Mom's back surgery so they were a welcome sight in my mailbox after a day of anxiety and waiting.  (She's doing great now, slowly but surely recovering.)

Variations Available
1 - 1935 / green back / 1934 statistics / 1935 copyright

The Card / Browns Team Set
That's a fanatic city sky line in the background behind Melillo.  National Chicle could have easily gone with a plain red sky behind the batter, but opted for a yellow and green sky line instead.  A fielding tip would have been a natural choice for the back of Melillo's card, but we get a base running tip instead.

1935 Season
Melillo was the Browns' opening day second baseman and appeared in 19 games for the club before a trade on May 27th sent him to the Red Sox for outfielder Moose Solters (#85) and cash.  At the time, the Browns desperately needed more offense and the Red Sox needed to improve their infield defense.  Melillo appeared in 106 games for the Red Sox, forming a strong double play combination with shortstop Joe Cronin (#123).  Melillo batted .260 with 39 RBIs.  His SABR biography notes his locker was stationed next to pitcher Lefty Grove (#1), who didn't speak to Melillo for several weeks after the second baseman had joined the club.  Back in 1931, Melillo had doubled off Grove to ruin his streak of 16 consecutive wins.  Ultimately, Grove relented and started talking to his new teammate.

1933 DeLong Gum #3
1933 George C. Miller (R300)
1934 Goudey #45
1934-36 Batter-Up (R318) #151
1961 Fleer Baseball Greats #127

Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1929-30 Exhibits Four-in-One (W463-1) #30
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (0):  N/A
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1993 Conlon Collection TSN #890

Melillo doesn't have any solo Topps flagship set appearances, but he appears as a coach on the Athletics' team card found in the 1956 Topps set.

43 - Melillo non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/13/21.

Sources:

Next Card: #54 "Hank" Greenberg - Detroit Tigers

Sunday, September 19, 2021

#90 Ray Hayworth - Detroit Tigers


Raymond Hall Hayworth
Detroit Tigers
Catcher

Bats:  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  180
Born:  January 29, 1904, High Point, NC
Major League Teams:  Detroit Tigers 1926, 1929-1938; Brooklyn Dodgers 1938-1939; New York Giants 1939; St. Louis Browns 1942; Brooklyn Dodgers 1944-1945
World Series Appearances:  Detroit Tigers 1934
Died:  September 25, 2002, Salisbury, NC (98)

Known as a strong defender behind the plate, Ray Hayworth spent almost 50 years in professional baseball as a player, manager and scout.  Beginning in 1934, after a few seasons of seeing regular playing time with the Tigers, Hayworth settled in as the back-up for future Hall of Famer and player/manager Mickey Cochrane (#9).  He was a member of the 1934 and 1935 Tigers teams that won the American League pennant, although he didn't appear in the 1935 World Series when the Tigers defeated the Cubs in six games.  Hayworth briefly returned to regular starting duties in 1936, but then spent the remaining years of his playing career as a back-up with the Tigers, Dodgers, Giants and Browns.  He appeared in nine games with the Dodgers in 1944 and 1945, as one of the oldest players in the league as World War II had severely depleted major league rosters.  Hayworth retired with 546 career hits and a .265 batting average.

He began his managerial career in 1946 when Dodgers president Branch Rickey hired him to manage the Fort Worth Cats, the Dodgers' Texas League affiliate.  He moved to the Cubs organization in 1947, and served as their chief of scouting operations in 1959.  Hayworth scouted Ernie Banks, signing the young star to a $22,000 contract in 1953.  Hayworth later scouted for the Braves (1960-1970) and Expos (1971-1973), before finally retiring from baseball.

Building the Set
August 26, 2021 from Port Washington, NY (Clean Sweep Auctions) - Card #26
I returned to Clean Sweep Auctions for a trio of cards for my Diamond Stars set to celebrate recent positive work-related news.  Again, while some people would prefer expensive trinkets or a fancy night on the town after a professional achievement, I prefer to celebrate by buying a few old baseball cards.  I'm getting more familiar with a lot of the usual players involved in eBay auctions for these older pre-war cards, and I've found Clean Sweep regularly has the most reasonable prices for their cards.  I've learned to steer clear of certain sellers who typically mark up their prices at what are occasionally twice as much as the same cards from Clean Sweep.  Another challenge while trying to build this set is trying to stay away from graded/slabbed cards.  I'd like to house the entire set in nine-pocket pages, in order, and so far I've been able to save myself the trouble of buying a slabbed card and having to jailbreak it from the hard plastic casing.  I realize I may decide to break this rule for some of the pricier cards in the set when I get to the point of adding those.

This is the second card I've added from the set's third and final series, issued in 1936.  All the cards issued in 1936 by National Chicle contain blue ink on the card backs, instead of the green ink used for the cards issued in 1934 and 1935.

Variations Available
1 - 1936 / blue back / 1935 statistics / 1936 copyright

The Card / Tigers Team Set
I'm assuming National Chicle intended that to be outfielder Goose Goslin (#112) making a cameo appearance on Hayworth's card, having a conversation with an umpire.  Goslin, a future Hall of Famer, played with the Tigers between 1934 and 1937 and wore #4 while with Detroit.  While Goslin didn't appear in the originally issued Diamond Stars cards released between 1934 and 1936, he did have a potential fourth series card that presumably could have been released in 1937.  Goslin would have to wait until the 1981 issuance of the extended set collector's series to finally receive his own Diamond Stars card.  Then again . . . maybe that's not even a Tigers player.  Hayworth is shown wearing a white Tigers hat while the mysterious #4 is shown wearing a dark hat.  The Tigers wore the white hat worn by Hayworth on the road for just the 1935 season.

The back of the card discusses Hayworth's role as Cochrane's back-up, and notes the Tigers are favored to repeat as American League champions in 1936.

1936 Season
But the Tigers did not repeat, dropping to second place and losing manager Cochrane to a nervous breakdown in early June.  Hayworth again assumed every day catching duties, ultimately appearing in 81 games and batting .240.  Coach Del Baker would take over for Cochrane during his absence.

1933 George C. Miller (R300)
1934-36 Batter-Up (R318) #165
1939 Play Ball #140
1940 Play Ball #155

Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1934-36 Batter-Up (R318) #165
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (0):  N/A
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1979 TCMA Diamond Greats #385

22 - Hayworth non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/5/21.

Sources:

Previous Card:  #89 Joe Stripp - Brooklyn Dodgers
Next Card: #91 Bucky Harris - Washington Senators

Sunday, September 12, 2021

#85 Julius Solters - St. Louis Browns


Julius Joseph Solters
St. Louis Browns
Outfield

Bats:
  Right  Throws:  Right  Height:  6'0"  Weight:  190
Born:  March 22, 1906, Pittsburgh, PA
Major League Teams:  Boston Red Sox 1934-1935; St. Louis Browns 1935-1936; Cleveland Indians 1937-1939; St. Louis Browns 1939; Chicago White Sox 1940-1941, 1943
Died:  September 28, 1975, Pittsburgh, PA (69)

In 1932, while playing for the Albany Senators in the Eastern League, Julius Solters was given the nickname Moose by Albany manager Bill McCorry and the name stuck throughout the rest of his playing career.  Solters was a  power-hitting outfield prospect with the Red Sox and began the 1935 season as Boston's opening day left fielder.  On May 27th that season, while the St. Louis Browns were in Boston, the Red Sox were in need of an infielder and Solters was dealt to the Browns for Ski Melillo (#53).  Apparently, without a new uniform, Solters had to attempt to wear the much smaller Melillo's old Browns uniform for the series, with Browns manager Rogers Hornsby (#44) promising to get Solters a bigger uniform once the team returned to St. Louis.

Solters clubbed a career-high 136 RBIs in 1936 with the Browns, but he was on the move again in January 1937 when he was dealt to Cleveland.  In his first year with the Indians, he batted a career high .323 to go along with a career-high 20 home runs.  He's spend the next several seasons as a bench player before getting a chance for more regular playing time with the White Sox in 1940.  On August 1, 1941, Solters was hit with an errant pre-game throw to the head that knocked him unconscious and would ultimately lead to his complete blindness.  He retired after nine seasons in the majors with 990 hits, and a .289 batting average to go along with 83 home runs and 599 RBIs.

Building the Set
August 26, 2021 from Port Washington, NY (Clean Sweep Auctions) - Card #25
I returned to Clean Sweep Auctions for a trio of cards for my Diamond Stars set to celebrate recent positive work-related news.  Again, while some people would prefer expensive trinkets or a fancy night on the town after a professional achievement, I prefer to celebrate by buying a few old baseball cards.  I'm getting more familiar with a lot of the usual players involved in eBay auctions for these older pre-war cards, and I've found Clean Sweep regularly has the most reasonable prices for their cards.  I've learned to steer clear of certain sellers who typically mark up their prices at what are occasionally twice as much as the same cards from Clean Sweep.  Another challenge while trying to build this set is trying to stay away from graded/slabbed cards.  I'd like to house the entire set in nine-pocket pages, in order, and so far I've been able to save myself the trouble of buying a slabbed card and having to jailbreak it from the hard plastic casing.  I realize I may decide to break this rule for some of the pricier cards in the set when I get to the point of adding those.

This is the first card I've added from the set's third and final series, issued in 1936, and the first card overall from that third series.  All the cards issued in 1936 by National Chicle contain blue ink on the card backs, instead of the green ink used for the cards issued in 1934 and 1935.

Variations Available
1 - 1936 / blue back / 1935 statistics / 1936 copyright

The Card / Browns Team Set
Solters is shown attempting a diving catch in the outfield, and I imagine the artist had to swap out his Red Sox uniform for a Browns uniform.  It looks as if someone may have taken a pencil to this card over the years and underlined Solters' new team, the Browns, on the back of the card.

1936 Season
Solters began the season with the Browns and he was the club's steady left fielder.  He appeared in 152 games, batting .291 with 17 home runs and 134 RBIs.  While his RBI total led the team, his home run total was second on the club behind third baseman Harlond Clift (#122).  Amazingly, his high RBI total was fifth in the league behind Zeke Bonura (#65), Jimmie Foxx (#64), Lou Gehrig (#130) and Hal Trosky (#70) who led the league with 162 RBIs.  Solters most frequently shared the Browns outfield with Beau Bell in right and Sam West in center.

1934 Goudey #30
1938 Goudey Heads-Up #279
1939 Play Ball #78
1940 Play Ball #126
1941 Double Play #71

Other Notable Baseball Cards
First Mainstream Card:  1934 Goudey #30
Topps Flagship Set Appearances (0):  N/A
Most Recent Mainstream Card:  1991 Conlon Collection TSN #285

23 - Solters non-parallel baseball cards in the Beckett online database as of 9/4/21.

Sources:

Previous Card:  #84 Sam Byrd - Cincinnati Reds
Next Card: #86 Frank Crosetti - New York Yankees